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, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to ho
him to account for what he does domestically and regionally. >> in cairo today delegations from israel and hamas are there for indirect talks to work on details beyond the initial cease-fire. i have a list of topics they're expected to cover, opening border crossings, easing israel's economic blockade and what do you expect from these discussions today? what are the chances any progress will be made? >> i think these already tough discussions. all the leverage that comes with having the military action on going is gone now. the pressure to make tough concessions and compromises is diminished and morsi is very distracted biz his own domestic crisis. i think you can have these talks go on for some time without major changes and that sets up the prospect for more conflict in the future. >> during this time if it takes awhile will the cease-fire hold? >> i think right now neither side has interest and i think more israel if iran starts to rearm hamas very quickly and i think they will see that as an untenable situation and it is possible you could over the next weeks see a resumption in so
normal force. >>> and we have brand-new video from cairo where the arab league is holding emergency meetings on the crisis. also today the white house urged diplomacy and a deescalation in the violence. let's get right to it on the ground and inside gaza where rockets are flying overhead. nbc's news correspondent is there for us live. let's get to what's happening right up now around you. >> reporter: well let's start off here with the situation in gaza. right now it is really quiet behind me. the streets of gaza are really empty. most people this time of night go to their homes. the streets are pretty much quiet. people here really bracing themselves for what the night usually brings. what we've seen over the course of the last several nights is an intense aerial campaign by the israeli forces. as you mentioned yesterday, the palestinian prime minister's office was destroyed. these air strikes will be intensifying in the coming hours. that's been the pattern. there's also been palestinian rocket fire coming out of gaza into southern israel. the fear that grips the people here is on
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)